Black Feather Rising (2008) 90'

Programme Note

BRIEF SYNOPSIS

At a tribal gathering, a young man and young woman see each other, and fall in love.  But she, West-Wind-Rising, is married with a child.  He, Raven Caller, is in subjection to a witch who, in her jealous fury, punishes him with the loss of his memory and magical powers.  But in his unconscious, his song of love sings on.  West-Wind-Rising, guided by it, sets out on a difficult and dangerous journey to find him.  Her way brings her toward the mysterious Black Feather Mountain, from where his song seems to be coming.  As she clambers down a sheer rock-face, a raven attacks her, and she falls.  Raven Caller finds her broken body almost lifeless.  Once, with his healing powers, he could have restored her.  Now he does not even recognize her; he cannot remember even his own name . . . In one continuous scene, the drama shows how they re-awaken each to the other, and by the miracle of love their lives and powers are restored.

The story is developed from a Native American legend, and is here re-worked as an inner dramatic journey for its two main characters.  Black Feather Mountain is music theatre with a quality of myth, inhabiting an elemental world of forest, rock, wind and birds, where human senses are still tuned in to the voices and wisdom of Nature around them, and song is everywhere.   The continuous action is an ascending curve of raw human emotion, from yearning, up through pain, terror, desolation, anger, to a climax of wonder and joy.   In a contemporary culture of noise, activity and ‘information’, it re-asserts the primacy of each individual human quest, the search within.

See also
DAVID RUDKIN: Wayward seeming but unerring: the strange genesis of Black Feather Rising

Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij) Black Feather Rising (photo Anna van Kooij)
 
< >